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Tucson Arizona Temple

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Pouring footings for foundation; anticipated to be completed in early 2018 (official announcement pending)

Tucson Arizona Mormon Temple
Location:  N Skyline Dr, Tucson, Arizona, United States.
Announcement:  6 October 2012
Groundbreaking and Site Dedication:  17 October 2015

Groundbreaking Ceremony

On Saturday, October 17, President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, second counselor in the First Presidency, presided at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Tucson Arizona Temple. Services were broadcast live to area meetinghouses in English and in Spanish.

Construction Status

As of September 2015, the Tucson Arizona Temple site has been cleared and cactus plants have been transplanted to an on-site nursery until they can be reintegrated into the final landscaping. A construction fence has been erected, and several black conduits are on site.

Construction Approval

In February 2013, a Church project manager submitted preliminary plans to Pima County to propose making Church-owned property in the Catalina Foothills, where East Ina Road curves into Skyline Drive, the site for the Tucson Arizona Temple. The 7-acre site was purchased by the Church in 2010, and a residence to the north was subsequently acquired.

The documents included surveys and environmental studies plus site and floor plans that used a rendering of a two-story, 34,000-square-foot mission-style building to represent the Tucson Arizona Temple. Plans proposed a 260-space parking lot with large areas of natural desert open space to provide a buffer for the surrounding neighborhood. No rezoning was required for the site, as it is already zoned to allow religious buildings.

The Shadow Roc Homeowners Association—the neighborhood where the proposed site is located—previously opposed an office development at that location. But association president, Stan Kartchner, himself a member of the Church, responded favorably to the temple plans. He indicated that a temple is "one of the more favorable uses we could imagine" for the property. He expressed his desire for Church representatives to open a dialogue with neighbors as the plans progress.1

Temple District

The Tucson Arizona Temple is anticipated to serve members from the following nine stakes: Marana Arizona Stake, Sahuarita Arizona Stake, Sierra Vista Arizona Stake, St David Arizona Stake, Tucson Arizona Stake, Tucson Arizona East Stake, Tucson Arizona North Stake, Tucson Arizona Rincon Stake, and Tucson Arizona West Stake. A final determination will be made before the temple is dedicated.

Temple Design

The Tucson Arizona Temple was originally designed with a 95-foot steeple, which would have required a special permit. However, plans were altered, and the steeple was replaced with a dome-shaped cupola—reminiscent of the famous dome that crowns Italy's Florence Cathedral—which does comply with Pima County planning and zoning regulations.

Temple Site

The site for the Tucson Arizona Temple is located in the Catalina Foothills where East Ina Road curves into Skyline Drive.

Temple Announcement

On October 6, 2012, President Thomas S. Monson announced plans for a temple to be built in Tucson, Arizona—Arizona's second largest city—during his opening remarks of the 182nd Semiannual General Conference.

The Tucson Arizona Temple will be the sixth in the state. Temples are currently operating in Mesa, Snowflake, the Gila Valley, Gilbert, and Phoenix. There are approximately 400,000 members of the Church in Arizona.2

Five stakes are headquartered in the city of Tucson with three additional stakes in the surrounding region, namely the Sahuarita Arizona Stake, Sierra Vista Arizona Stake, and St. David Arizona Stake. The units that will be served by the Tucson Arizona Temple have not yet been announced but are likely to include these eight stakes.

Temple Facts

The Tucson Arizona Temple will be the sixth temple built in Arizona, following the Mesa Arizona Temple (1927), the Snowflake Arizona Temple (2002), The Gila Valley Arizona Temple (2010), the Gilbert Arizona Temple (2014), and the Phoenix Arizona Temple (2014).

1. Becky Pallack, "Foothills site likely for Mormon temple," Arizona Daily Star 4 May 2013, 4 May 2013 .
2. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints News Release, "Church Announces New Temples in Arizona and Peru," 6 Oct. 2012.

"And [there were] other choice spirits who were reserved to come forth in the fulness of times to take part in laying the foundations of the great latter-day work, including the building of the temples and the performance of ordinances therein."
—D&C 138:53–54

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